COLORBLIND: A NEW PLAY BY NAACP AWARD WINNING PLAYWRIGHT is CLOSED

COLORBLIND
A NEW PLAY BY NAACP AWARD WINNING PLAYWRIGHT WALLACE DEMARRIA TO MAKE ITS NEW YORK PREMIERE OFF-BROADWAY AT ACTORS TEMPLE THEATRE THIS SPRING

PREVIEWS BEGAN MONDAY, APRIL 25th, 2022
OFFICIAL OPENING NIGHT SET FOR MONDAY, MAY 2nd

L to R: Valence Thomas, Gregory Warren, Joseph Salvatore Knipper, Wallace Demarria, Jessica Catalano, Dana Harris, Jeremy Rosenblum

(New York, NY) – The New York based theater company Outside Studios today announced that it will present the Off-Broadway premiere of COLORBLIND, a play about how race figures into love and judgement in America. Written by NAACP Award-Winning Playwright Wallace Demarria, and co-directed by Mr. Demarria and Amanda White-Del Pino.

The production begins previews on Monday, April 25th at Actors Temple Theatre, 339 West 47th St.  The official opening night is set for Monday, May 2nd. 

https://www.colorblindoffbroadway.com

COLORBLIND dives headfirst into the long-standing racial inequality in America. It follows the life of Mr. Clinton Muhammad, the controversial spiritual leader of the Minority Empowerment Movement. His militant speeches and fiery stance against “the oppression and discrimination” of minorities has divided all that come in contact with him. Some love and idolize him while others despise him and plot his demise. At the peak of his meteoric rise, a life altering event puts everything Muhammad believes into question. Colorblind tackles the issues from every angle, leaving the audience to ask themselves: is it possible to have a truly “colorblind” society? Colorblind is a story of love, patriotism, betrayal, violence and redemption. Does love care about ethnicity?

COLORBLIND made its world premiere at The Meta Theater in Los Angeles in 2013. The four-week engagement extended to eight weeks due to the run’s sold-out performances. The successful run at The Meta Theater was followed by another successful eight-week run at the Santa Monica Playhouse in 2014.

The cast of COLORBLIND features Wallace Demarria, Dana Patrice, Joseph Salvatore Knipper, Greg Warren, Hank Dennis, Valence Thomas, Jeremy Rosenblum, and Jessica Catalano. COLORBLIND  features set and wardrobe design by Ru, lighting design by Maarten Cornelis, and original music composition by Nat Jenkins. The Production Stage Manager is Aurora Winger. Wallace Demarria is an actor, playwright and award-winning director who received critical acclaim as well as award nods for Colorblind. A Little Rock, Arkansas native, he landed his first movie role at the age of eight years old, and later was offered the lead role (originally intended for a white actor) in the film “Too Scared to Laugh.” After graduating Fisk University, Wallace entered a drama competition beating out 5,000 other actors. He took the top prize, and was the only competitor offered a contract with a Los Angeles-based talent agency. Mr. Demarria has since sold 4 scripts and been nominated for multiple NAACP Theatre Awards and was awarded Best Playwright in 2016. Amanda White-Del Pino is a creative producer with over 15 years of experience in the television, media, and production industry. Ms. White-Del Pino is a Producer, Director and Editor working for ad agencies/production companies as well as organizing and creating content for short films and social media.  A graduate with a BA in Film/Video from Columbia College Chicago, she has worked on such film projects as Retales, Hanging in There, Clout and most recently making her directorial debut in Till Death Do Us Part.

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Performances of COLORBLIND are on Mondays at 7:00PM, Wednesdays at 7:00PM, and Saturdays at 2:00PM. Tickets range from $37 (balcony general admission) to $57 (regular orchestra general admission). Premium seats are available for $72. There is a $2.50 facility fee on all tickets. To purchase tickets, click HERE

Actors Temple Theatre

Located at 339 West 47th St NYC (Between 8th and 9th Avenue)

 
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of a Lifetime – a new Electro-Rock/Sci-Fi Musical -CLOSED: Final Perf. Nov 28, 2021

Young Andy hasn’t had much luck in life or love – a change in fortune brings him into a windfall in the form of an old run-down house – called ‘of a Lifetime’ which currently houses a completely self-sufficient mysterious community that appear to be lost in time… Beware the Treachery – How people Change!!!

CLOSED- FINAL PERFORMANCE November 28 , 2021

WEBSITE: https://ofalifetimemusical.com/

of a Lifetime Cast Members

Carly Wheeler, Chloe Solomon, Inri Faye, Bryan Douglas, Sage Spiker, Nathaniel Rosenthalis

of a Lifetime Creative Team

Book, Music & Lyrics: James C.K. Jefferies
Director: Dalia Sevilla
Choreographer: Alexx Stachowiak
Light design: Maarten Cornelis
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First Preview Date Opening Date On Sale Through
October 31, 2021 October 31, 2021 CLOSED- FINAL PERF
November 28, 2021

CLOSED- FINAL PERFORMANCE November 28 , 2021

Actors Temple TheatreTheatre is located at 339 West 47th Street between 8th and 9th Ave. NYC.

“The Importance of Being Earnestly LGBTQ+” is CLOSED

Importance of Being Earnestly LGBTQ Tickets Off BroadwayA modern inclusive spin on Oscar Wilde’s classic tale, The Importance of Being Earnest, re-imagined with LGBTQ+ representation.

John “Jack” Worthing loves NYC and Gwyn Fairfax, and he can have both when he assumes the name of his made-up brother, Ernest. When Agernon, “Algy” (John’s best friend) falls in love with Cecil (John’s ward), he too decides to take on the name of Ernest. With John pursuing one man and Algy pursuing another, Lady Bracknell (who happens to be Gwyn’s mother) slowly unravels the odd strings of potential matchmaking. Of course, with two men and one name they share, what follows is a mess of imaginary identities, good natured gossip, and ridiculous romance. The Importance of Being Earnestly LGBTQ+ brings Oscar Wilde’s “trivial comedy for serious people ” to contemporary times with new laughter, color and heart.

“I’m proud to create a world where coming out is never a thing, allowing our heroes to be unapologetically themselves. We will root for each one of them in our own way as we identify their fallible struggles and triumphs as everyone’s allowed to be complete human beings in love.” –Maarten Cornelis

Original February 14th, 1895 Review from Opening Night –
“The Importance of being Earnest, belongs indubitably to the first class. It is delightful to see it, it sends wave after wave of laughter curling and foaming round the theatre…”

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FOR TICKETS:

Now Playing Tuesdays at 7 PM.
Contact Telecharge for Tickets

Beginning May 12 (New Schedule)
Thurs and Suns @ 7 pm

Box Office opens one hour before performance

The Reviews Are Coming In :  Theatre Pizzazz

The Importance of Being Earnestly LGBTQ+

Jul 12, 2021 | Theater

Review By Michael Tingley

While flipping through the program before the show, I stumbled on two quotes that would capture the beauty of this adaptation of The Importance of Being Earnest. The first is from Producer/Director/Lighting Designer Maarten Cornelis, “What if members of the LGBTQ+ community never had to step out of the closet because we never had to be in it in the first place?” The other is from Michael Morley’s bio — who plays the bubbly and wonderfully petulant Cecil Cardew — “Michael Morley is thrilled to make Oscar Wilde even more gay!”

Wilde, as we all know, was born too early, we’re still catching up to him. Morley reminds us that in Earnest, Wilde held himself back to fit the milieu. Cornelis wants to imagine Wilde freed from his time and goes beyond adaptation; Earnestly LGBTQ+ more than places the Victorian Earnest into the present, more than swaps paisley for Pride parades, opium dens for trap-houses, Victoria for Biden, and buttonholed green carnations for mesh tops and death drops. Instead, Earnestly LGBTQ+ imagines if Wilde, equal parts wit and iconoclast, wrote today — what would it be like? It asks, and it answers, fabulously. Let me explain.

First, all the relationships in the play are LGBTQ+. It is not such a simple change as one might expect as the actors are acutely aware. By making Earnest “even more gay” the show reveals how “gay” it was in the first place. The actors have found that the dialogue subtly changes when the relationship is queered, and the players emphasize these nuances wonderfully. Next, no one walks in this show, there’s only strutting (the stomping tantrums of Cecil Cardew being the exception). Lady Bracknell, played by Denise Turkan — think Eastern European/Turkish Devil Wears Prada Meryl Streep — has become Cerberus-like, splitting lines with her two tremendous…assistants? Lovers? It’s unclear but it’s clearly hilarious. J. Mahal and Lyman Heung sass, bend, and seduce their way around the stage.

Playing Miss Prism is the confident and dynamic Lauren E. King. The love affair between Prism and Dr. Chasuble, played by Marie Angelo, is moving in a play that ridicules moving emotions — or any movement at all (“It is awfully hard work doing nothing”). The cynical, if not positively pessimistic, Lane finds multiple facets when played by Alison Wien. The added scene where Mahal and Heung change Lane into Merriman, Jack Worthing’s butler in the country, gives the butlers a sexuality often ignored in other productions.

But if we’re speaking of seduction — and really one can’t avoid it when talking about this show — Kenon Veno is unsurpassed. He plays by far the most dynamic, attractive, (adjectives don’t do the performance justice) Gwyn I have ever had the fortune to watch. The charged scenes between Veno and Preston Fox, as John Worthing, and Michael Morley, Cecil Cardew, should not be missed. Always a favorite of mine, the scene between Cardew and Gwyn in the country garden is the best rendition I’ve seen. Morley and Veno are exceptional together, sharing an energy and play only possible to achieve by actors who love their roles and fit them.

Finally, the outrageous best friends turned brothers, John Worthing and Algernon Moncrieff, played by Preston Fox and Clint Blakely, interrogate, rouse, and trick each other. In most productions, Jack Worthing is an uptight Victorian wrestling with his desires. The Jack in Earnestly LGBTQ+ has to be all that in lace shirts with bleached hair. Fox pulls it all off though, and still manages to be an exceptionally engaging partner for Blakely’s Algernon, a character famous for his desire to eat everything – including the play. Blakely plays this voracious part exceptionally well, delivering some of Wilde’s most memorable lines with grace and humor.

Earlier I mentioned Cornelis was Producer/Director/Lighting Designer, each of these roles is as important as the last in this show. The lighting is playful, neon, romantic. The actors have fun competing for their best light. Earnestly LGBTQ+ is a romp, a delight, and an imaginative liberation of Wilde’s most loved work.

Produced by Write Act Repertory and Gatehouse Entertainment at The Actors Temple, 339 West 47 St., NYC

                      ++ (Follow Link)  Theatre Scene Review ++
“Wackiness abounds as Wilde’s classic is updated to present day NYC with same-sex couples, a Grindr reference, fashionistas and nightclub-style dances.” The Importance of Being Earnestly LGBTQ+ is a theatrical alternative romp.
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The Importance of Being Earnestly LGBTQ+ Cast Members:

Preston Fox (John / Earnest), Clint Blakely (Algy), Kenon Veno (Gwen), Michael Morley (Cecil), Denise Turkan (Lady Bracknell), and Lauren E King (Miss Prism), Marie Anello (Dr. Chasuble), Samantha Randolph (Merriman / Lane), with J. Mahal (Dancer 1) and Lyman Heung (Dancer 2)

The Importance of Being Earnestly LGBTQ+ Creative Team

Author: Oscar Wilde
Director: Maarten Cornelis
Choreographer: J. Mahal and Lyman Heung
Producer: John Lant and Maarten Cornelis in association with Write Act Repertory and Gatehouse Entertainment
Press Agent: Daniel DeMello

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The Importance of Being Earnestly LGBTQ+ Related Links

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Located at 339 West 47th Street (Between 8th and 9th Avenue)

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